Mouse

Mouse

You’re inside a box
And you’re thinking outside.
And still you can’t figure out
How the house mouse crept through
An opening, right into the kitchen
And on to the container holding
A few kilo grams of rice.

And you wonder, how can solid walls
And sturdy doors be outwitted by a rodent.
And you look through the ceiling
Where a wire pierces, or the washing machine
From where a canal goes out, you search
The pantry for a sign of mouse droppings
Or coir for nesting, and still you find nothing.

And as you ponder, an epiphany strikes
I’m not that smart nor am I practical enough to be a
Mouse detective. The PhD that holds me on a pedestal
Could have easily been on mouse models, still
I’m perplexed at how a house mouse
Can outfox the fortress that is our kitchen.

And finally after laying the traps
A few times, you catch Mr Mousey
And your wife happens to fall in love with it.
The big ears and the whiskers, almost kissable she says.
And we take it to a deserted jungle
To let it lose and you come home
To an empty house.

All of a sudden the kitchen is empty
No sound, no master or contingency plan
No long conversations in bed on how
To outmaneuver the house mouse
We seem to be stuck in a rut.

Its amazing how much a mouse
Takes over your life. Now the silence
Wraps us, roof seems to sink, walls appear to shrink
As claustrophobia takes us hostage
How beautiful was three!

All of a sudden we are tearing our clothes
Off, in a hysterical hurry to make love.
It’s that time of the month to greet
Humpty Dumpty falling from the ovaries.
We are stricken with baby fever.

And two weeks after, we see two pink lines
On a peed strip. We are overjoyed at annunciation.
And we tell our circle of family and friends
With a twinkle and a grin.

“It took a mouse to get her pregnant”

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Author: meandererworld (Dilantha Gunawardana)

Dr Dilantha Gunawardana is a molecular biologist who graduated from the University of Melbourne. He moonlights as a poet. His poems have been accepted/published in Forage, American Journal of Poetry, Kitaab, Eastlit and Ravens Perch. He mixes science with poetry for a living, when what matters is the expression of both DNA and words into something serendipitous. Although an Australian citizen, Dilantha is domiciled in Sri Lanka, his country of birth.

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