Down syndrome

down-sydnrome

I look in through the noise of the heart bell
The angelus chiming loud as ever

I see a little infant on a little bassinet, crouched in the middle
Thumb in mouth, crying for breast feed

And she will be more beautiful than any child I’ll ever know
She won’t dream of a doctor’s set or Barbie’s perfection

She will count the stars in the sky and fall like a meteor
To our arms. She will make miracles happen every dusk.

As I come home she will be the dasher to the gate
And the walker leashed to my hand

I can then count the eyes that glimmer like maple syrup
And a voice that makes slurry nasal sounds

As crispy as her tongue and larynx collude. If I sit down
I can count the tresses on her little temple

And if my memory is good, the kisses pinched
On my grateful cheeks, and the countdowns are all

Beautiful, as I look at a photomicrograph that spell out
A unique karyotype. Then she becomes even more

Spectacular, like the moon that does not hide during the day.
Her face will never know, the white lie or green envy

Only perhaps the red blush. The number 47 they say has killed
More people in history than any other numeric.

Yet 47 to us, is a beautiful number, when child
Makes childlike a little game for adults.

A little girl who will never see or be trapped
Inside an adult mind. Genetics is just a little extra

Helping of a miniature chromosome – what is
More beautiful than 47 little champions

Inside a cell, making an endearing sculpture. Beauty
For us is a syndrome of love and innocence

And we cheer on every day, at one paltry chromosome
A rope that binds us tighter than an umbilical cord.

And this landslide of biology was all it took
For a watershed of blessings.

Love could do no other but flood……

Advertisements

Author: meandererworld (Dilantha Gunawardana)

Dr Dilantha Gunawardana is a molecular biologist who graduated from the University of Melbourne. He moonlights as a poet. His poems have been accepted/published in Forage, American Journal of Poetry, Kitaab, Eastlit and Ravens Perch. He mixes science with poetry for a living, when what matters is the expression of both DNA and words into something serendipitous. Although an Australian citizen, Dilantha is domiciled in Sri Lanka, his country of birth.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s